Unknown unknowns: A White Kid – Flowers through the snow

Standard

Spring.

Advertisements

New music from The Deltahorse

Standard

Check out this new jam from The Deltahorse!

“Howdy to all of you lovely people out there!

The Deltahorse is getting ready to release their debut full length album this fall and we do need your support to make it happen.

Please head over to our campaign at musicraiser.com and check out our music, videos and all the lovely rewards we have to offer for anyone who decides to contribute for the release of this upcoming album.

www.musicraiser.com/projects/3618

Thank you for all the support in advance!

And don’t forget to check out our soundcloud page at:

@deltahorse

Oh yes, and this post has nothing to do with spam 😉

Thank you,

The Deltahorse”

10 Questions with Chris Picciuolo of The Uncle Steves

Standard
one small dreamchris
1: How would you characterize your music?

C: I would say my music is quite simply a bunch of sounds and melodies patched together during desperate times.

2: What is one early music experience that made a deep impression on you//made you rethink what music can sound like//has helped shape the music you make today?

C: My first music experience was when I would play these weird little tunes at on the piano at my Grandparent’s house. I was a sensitive kid, probably 6 years old. I remember my Grandpa sitting in his chair just listening, and when I was done, he told me that I sounded alright but I could use some lessons. For some reason, that always struck a chord with me, and he very well could have meant it in a positive way. But I took it hard. I don’t think I played piano again for a long time. I got my first snare drum, rented from the Catholic School I was attending. I had a couple of lessons in the convent basement, but I did poorly and remember feeling like I wish I could take off the sound pad on top of the snare. I wanted to really hit that thing. The nuns didn’t like that. I think what helped shape my music is that need to do the opposite of what people always told me to do. I never got piano or drum lessons, and I took each instrument up by ear over the years, starting in my mid-teens. I know that sounds stubborn and it probably is. But that stubbornness really is the main driving force behind the music I make.

3. What is usually your process when creating//writing a new song?

C: It can vary on the day, really. It all depends on if I have the will to record at any given moment. The only time I plan to record is during short spurts of house-sitting for a friend, in his basement. Other than that, I will usually just have to want to make time to set up the microphone on my computer and pull out an acoustic guitar and whatever random percussion I have sitting around.

4. Where can we find your music//what have you done to make your music available?

C: I have my music available to purchase on theunclesteves.bandcamp.com

I’ve made a handful of music videos that I directed that are up on Youtube. I think the name is, “TheUncleSteves” on there. So, youtube.com/TheUncleSteves
I’ve tried selling my albums online but after the first album or two, I declined in the amount of people buying. It started to only be acquaintances, close friends, or family who would buy.

5. What is a recent musician//band//music that you are excited about?

C: Well, they’re not recent-recent. But I am pretty excited about Dr. Dog and Hacienda. Those are some talented fellows.

6. How would you describe the music climate in your home when you were a child?

C: Not very many instruments until I got my first drum set at 15. It was a Royce kit, pretty cheap. But there was always a cassette in the house playing The Beatles, The Beach Boys, Willie Nelson, Peter Paul and Mary, etc. A bunch of different artists from that era.

7. Is style//image important to you and if so what//who do you consider cool in music?

C: I think an honest style and image is important. If wearing traffic cones on your head works for you, do it. As long as you carry it well. I consider bands like Little Dragon and Black Moth Super Rainbow to be pretty damn cool, especially when it comes to style and image, from album covers to live performances to press photos. I really connect to their imagery.

8. What song do you want playing at your funeral?

C: I’ve never really thought about this one. I’m not sure of an exact song, maybe the whole White Album or a collection of old blues tunes from the 1920’s. Maybe some Spice Girls. I want to make it a weird one.

9. Why music and why do you make it?

C: Music is the one thing that has consistently kept me looking forward to life over the years. I make it because I have to. If I’m not making music, I feel like that’s one less collection of sounds I can throw out into the universe and I want to do as much music as possible before I die.

10. If I should listen to one undiscovered musician//song today who//what should I check out?

C: Possessed by Paul James is up there, although he has had some mild success lately. It helps to be backed by a label, as small as the label might be. Pocket Vinyl is another one that comes to mind, Husband and wife duo. He plays keys and sings while she paints lovely pieces on stage. Check out their record, “Death Anxiety” Great stuff.

Visit The Uncle Steves at:

10 Questions with Jordaan Mason

Standard

jordaan mason

1. How would you characterize your music?

J: Medicated, illiterate, wandering.

2. What is one early music experience that made a deep impression on you//made you rethink what music can sound like//has helped shape the music you make today?

J: This is a very difficult question. I could think of plenty of examples. But here’s one: hearing Hole’s “Live Through This” for the first time. I was probably seven or eight. I know I didn’t fully understand what most of the songs were about back then but I knew that they were completely honest, and that left a mark.

3. What is usually your process when creating//writing a new song?

J: Write words very slowly over a long period of time, then work at giving them rhythm and structure, eventually pick up my guitar or sit at a piano, try to write a riff, sing over it, hate it, start over, repeat.

4. Where can we find your music//what have you done to make your music available?

J: All of my albums are available on my bandcamp: http://thehorsemuseum.bandcamp.com. I don’t charge a lot for most of them and some of them are pay-what-you-can. I just released two new singles from my upcoming album – one of them is streaming on the bandcamp and the other is streaming with a music video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Rnv-RXJHxE

5. What is a recent musician//band//music that you are excited about?

J: Perfume Genius has been blowing my mind.

6. How would you describe the music climate in your home when you were a child?

J: I grew up in a house that was filled with music of all kinds. I had three older siblings who all had very different taste and my parents both were eclectic as well. We would often sit and listen to music together as a family and talk about the lyrics, which I think was very formative. I also spent many hours alone in front of the stereo reading through liner notes and singing along.

7. Is style//image important to you and if so what//who do you consider cool in music?

J: Bjork is cooler than anyone else living on this planet.

8. What song do you want playing at your funeral?

J: Nina Simone’s cover of George Harrison’s “Isn’t It A Pity.”

9. Why music and why do you make it?

J: Music because it is of the body, it hits the body, it makes the body ring out. I make it because I don’t understand my body except when I am singing.

10. If I should listen to one unknown musician//song today who//what should I check out?

J: If you can find the album “A Kali Yuga Opera” by Holy Haunted Head in the ether of the internet, I highly recommend it. It saved my life on more than one occasion.


Help Jordaan Mason’s new album The Decline of Stupid Fucking Western Civilization find a material form by donating at: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/the-decline-of-stupid-fucking-western-civilization

Or visit:

http://thehorsemuseum.bandcamp.com

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Jordaan-Mason/172415860243


10 Questions with Zachary Friederich

Standard
zachary friederich

1. How would you characterize your music?

Z: It all feels like Pop to me. Like most people, I’m influenced by all kinds of things and they’re just put in a kind of songwriting blender and mixed up and poured out. I tend to hop around genres. I guess one thing that I tend to focus on is storytelling.

2. What is one early music experience that made a deep impression on you//made you rethink what music can sound like//has helped shape the music you make today?

Z: One of the earliest things I remember is taking my parents Beatles LPs and recording them onto blank cassettes so I could listen to them over and over. I also remember that my older brother had the first Violent Femmes album and I would take that tape and listen to it every night as I fell asleep. I was in like fourth grade, I think. I couldn’t have possibly related to the subject matter but it really drew me in. And I’d be lying if I didn’t say that I thought Marty McFly was supercool when he played “Johnny B Goode.”

3. What is usually your process when creating//writing a new song?

Z: Well, I try to be open to anything that comes. A lot of times with the music, I noodle around until I find something catchy and then build from there. Lyrically, I guess it’s kind of the same, but I’ll have this inner voice or muse or whatever you want to call it. It will lead me in a direction and I just try to follow it. A lot of the times it will tell me what happens in a story and I’ll just take the characters from point A to point B in the verse lines. Sometimes, if I’m lucky, I’ll stumble onto some kind of truth about life or love or whatever.

4. Where can we find your music//what have you done to make your music available?

Z: All of my music is available as free downloads at https://soundcloud.com/zacharyfriederich

5. What is a recent musician//band//music that you are excited about?

Z: Most of the new music I listen to is on Soundcloud. A couple of my favorites are Naked House, dubious rothchild, Nicholas Burke. There are so many talented people just releasing their stuff DIY.

6. How would you describe the music climate in your home when you were a child?

Z: No one in my family was a musician but they were all music lovers. My parents listened to a lot of classic rock and so I didn’t have to go far to discover The Stones and Led Zeppelin and most importantly, The Beatles, which is the music that really made me want to do this. My older brother listened to a lot of what they called back then “College Rock,” so that’s where I heard The Pixies for the first time and they were a pretty big influence.

7. Is style//image important to you and if so what//who do you consider cool in music?

Z: It’s not that important to me. I mean, I think 1966 Bob Dylan looks really cool but that’s not the reason I think he’s great. He’s great because “Visions Of Johanna” is a breathtaking piece of art. I think style is a great way to sell things to the masses but it certainly doesn’t dictate talent. The thing in music that I’ve always thought was the coolest was smart lyric writing. When I think about the music that has influenced me most, Dylan, The Beatles, The Clash, The Pixies, that’s the thread that ties them together.

8. What song do you want playing at your funeral?

Z: One of mine, I guess. I mean, it’s my funeral. Luckily, I will get to dodge the task of being funeral DJ.

9. Why music and why do you make it?

Z: I don’t know. I have these songs in me and I have to get them out. It’s just what I do. I have to.

10. If I should listen to one undiscovered musician//song today who//what should I check out?

Z: If you want to hear a great song go check out “My Scarlet Black” by Black Hole Future. Just awesome. https://soundcloud.com/black-hole-future/my-scarlet-black